C Programming Tutorial 4: Pointers and Arrays


1.0 Introduction

A pointer variable holds the address of another variable. It is said to be "pointing" to that variable. For example,

int *ip;

defines a variable ip of type integer pointer. ip points to a variable of type integer. At the implementation level, it holds the address of a variable to type integer.Read more

I/O multiplexing: select, poll and epoll in Linux


1.0 I/O multiplexing

I/O multiplexing is the the ability to perform I/O operations on multiple file descriptors. Input operations like read, accept and calls for receiving messages block when there is no incoming data. So, if an input call is made and it blocks, we may miss data from other file descriptors.… Read more

POSIX real-time signals in Linux


1.0 Signals

Signals are notifications delivered asynchronously to a process by the kernel. Signals are grouped in two categories. First, there are standard signals, which have been there since the early days of Unix. Second, there are POSIX real-time signals which are specified in POSIX.1b, or, IEEE Std 1003.1b-1993, for Real-time Extensions for POSIX compliant Operating Systems.… Read more

How to create a temporary file in Linux

1.0 Temporary Files

Quite often, we need temporary files in our programs. Some intermediate data needs to be stored and the file can be discarded when the process terminates. There are functions and command to create temporary files in Linux. The mkstemp function creates a temporary file and returns a file descriptor.… Read more